Queen Elizabeth's Funeral: The Mystery of Her Coffin

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Writed by - Andy Gocker
 Queen Elizabeth's coffin lay in state at the Palace of Westminister for three days
Queen Elizabeth's coffin was laid out in the Palace of Westminister for three days - the public could say goodbye. © IMAGO/NurPhoto, IMAGO/Enrico Mattia Del Punta, www.imago-images.de

Am Queen Elizabeth died on September 8, 2022 at the age of 96 at Balmoral Castle in Scotland . After days of saying goodbye, Monday (September 19) the funeral of the British Queen will take place at Windsor Castle . However, according to the Times, her coffin was made at least 32 years ago and is made of English oak and lead - a composition with tradition.

Adorned with a wreath of flowers from the gardens of Balmoral Castle

The coffin was first seen by the public on Sunday a week ago when it was laid out as part of the funeral journey at Holyrood Palace in Edinburgh, Scotland. It was magnificently adorned with a floral wreath of white heather, sweet peas and dahlias from the gardens of Balmoral Castle in Scotland - the place where the Queen died. In addition to the extraordinary floral decoration, the condition of the coffin is also associated with great tradition.

A leaden coffin for burial in Windsor Castle Chapel

Lining the coffin with lead is a tradition of British royals and has the function of sealing the coffin airtight to keep moisture out. This ensures that Queen Elizabeth's body is preserved longer. This is also important given that the burial will not take place in a cemetery but in St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle - where Queen Elizabeth next to Prince Philip's coffin († 99) should find their final resting place.

The lead contained in the coffin also makes it significantly heavier than usual coffins, which is why a total of eight pallbearers are needed if the burial takes place in the evening. The coffin's brass handles are also exceptional and were designed by a Birmingham firm, according to the Times newspaper. And the lid of the royal coffin must also be made extra stable in order to withstand the royal crown, scepter and orb lying on it during the laying out and the funeral service.

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